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Showing posts from August, 2022

Fugates of Kentucky: Skin Bluer than Lake Louise - ABC News

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Feb. 22, 2012— -- Benjamin "Benjy" Stacy so frightened maternity doctors with the color of his skin -- "as Blue as Lake Louise" -- that he was rushed just hours after his birth in 1975 to University of Kentucky Medical Center. As a transfusion was being readied, the baby's grandmother suggested to doctors that he looked like the "blue Fugates of Troublesome Creek." Relatives described the boy's great-grandmother Luna Fugate as "blue all over," and "the bluest woman I ever saw." In an unusual story that involves both genetics and geography, an entire family from isolated Appalachia was tinged blue. Their ancestral line began six generations earlier with a French orphan, Martin Fugate, who settled in Eastern Kentucky. Doctors don't see much of the rare blood disorder today, because mountain people have dispersed and the family gene pool is much more diverse. But the Fugates' story still offers a window into a

Karan Nagrani is using social media to raise awareness about the 'spectrum of blindness' - ABC News

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What comes to mind when you think of blindness? Is it a person donning dark sunglasses, possibly with a cane, or a guide dog? There are certainly people with vision loss who fit this bill, but for many others, their experience of blindness is not quite so black and white. Karan Nagrani is legally blind, but if you passed him in the street it's likely you wouldn't know. Karan Nagrani wants people to know blindness affects people in many different ways. ( Supplied: Karan Nagrani ) Diagnosed at the age of 11 with a degenerative genetic condition called retinitis pigmentosa, the now 36-year-old only has a fraction of his vision remaining. "It starts off as night blindness and loss of side vision, and then the central [vision] starts to get affected," Mr Nagrani said. "When people look ahead, they see 180 degrees … I see less than three degrees, and at night, it's completely black." From his home in the southern coastal ci

Harlequin ichtyosis in babies: What it is and symptoms - Medical News Today

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Harlequin ichthyosis is a severe and rare genetic disorder affecting the skin. Infants with this condition are born with thick, scale-like skin plates all over their bodies. Harlequin ichthyosis is the most severe form of congenital ichthyosis, a group of skin disorders that cause persistently thick, rough, dry, and fish-scale-like skin all over the body. This severe and life threatening condition can affect an infant's breathing, eating, and movement. This article discusses harlequin ichthyosis, its signs and symptoms, causes, and treatment. Harlequin ichthyosis, also called harlequin baby syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder that affects the skin. Other names for the condition include: ichthyosis fetalis autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis 4B Ichthyosis congenita It is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder that affects 1 in 500,000 newborns. About seven children with harlequin ichthyosis are born in the United States yearly. The condition affects males and females equal

Astigmatism. Symptoms, Causes and Treatment - Healthnews.com

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Astigmatism is a type of refractive error, like myopia (nearsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness). Refractive error is a problem with the accuracy of light focusing on the retina, the light-sensitive tissue inside the eye. Refractive error results from an atypical eye shape, causing light rays not to refract (bend) properly. Refractive error is the most common ocular problem affecting all age groups. The estimated worldwide prevalence of astigmatism in adults is 40.4%. In developed countries, refractive error is correctable. In developing countries, however, uncorrected refractive error causes substantial visual impairment. Symptoms When astigmatism is mild, it may not impact vision very much, if at all. When it becomes more significant, however, it can affect visual clarity. With astigmatism, you may find your vision blurry and distorted. This generally impacts both far and near vision. You may find yourself squinting to see better. You may experience eyestrain or hea

Pink Eye in Kids: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - Verywell Health

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Conjunctivitis , also known as pink eye, is an infection or inflammation of the conjunctiva, the membrane that covers the whites of the eyes and the inner eyelids. Pink eye is very contagious. It's estimated that about 6 million people in the United States experience pink eye every year.  Children in group settings such as school or day care are especially at risk. This article describes how to recognize pink eye in children and treatment options. SbytovaMN / Getty Images Identifying Pink Eye in Kids The first sign of pink eye in children is usually eye redness. The white portion of their eye may appear pink or red. Other symptoms include: Eyelid swelling Eye discharge Increased tear production Crusting over the eyelids or eyelashes  Eye itching Irritation or burning sensation  Pink Eye Causes There are several possible causes of pink eye in children, and treatment may vary based on the underl

Pink Eye in Kids: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment - Verywell Health

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Conjunctivitis , also known as pink eye, is an infection or inflammation of the conjunctiva, the membrane that covers the whites of the eyes and the inner eyelids. Pink eye is very contagious. It's estimated that about 6 million people in the United States experience pink eye every year.  Children in group settings such as school or day care are especially at risk. This article describes how to recognize pink eye in children and treatment options. SbytovaMN / Getty Images Identifying Pink Eye in Kids The first sign of pink eye in children is usually eye redness. The white portion of their eye may appear pink or red. Other symptoms include: Eyelid swelling Eye discharge Increased tear production Crusting over the eyelids or eyelashes  Eye itching Irritation or burning sensation  Pink Eye Causes There are several possible causes of pink eye in children, and treatment may vary based on the underl

Natural treatment for conjunctivitis - Medical News Bulletin

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Conjunctivitis, commonly known as pink eye, occurs when the conjunctiva of the eye becomes inflamed. The conjunctiva is the white fiber membrane that lines the eyelid and serves to provide protection and lubrication to the eye by producing mucus and tears. Conjunctivitis is caused by a bacterial or viral infection usually from foreign bodies entering the eyes, environmental toxins, sleeping with makeup on, frequently rubbing your eyes or irritation from constant lenses. Conjunctivitis is accompanied by symptoms such as pain, ocular discharge, the presence of red eyes and edema (swelling). 1 Treatment for bacterial conjunctivitis typically consist of antibiotics but what is a natural treatment for conjunctivitis? Sea Water Sea water, also known as saline, has shown to be an effective method for treating infectious conjunctivitis. One study discovered that seat water is a natural remedy known for its antibacterial properties. It was reported that after heat sterilization

What does monkeypox look like compared to 7 other skin conditions - Insider

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Monkeypox causes a rash that can look similar to other illnesses such as acne, herpes or syphilis. Two dermatologists told Insider the key differences between monkeypox and seven other rashes. Monkeypox spreads through close contact with an infected person or from touching contaminated items. Monkeypox can cause a rash that looks similar to other illnesses, including herpes or syphilis  — but there are some key differences, dermatologists told Insider.  Alongside a fever, a rash is one of the main symptoms of monkeypox. A recent study found that of 528 monkeypox cases diagnosed in 16 countries between April and June of this year, 95% had a rash, Insider previously reported. Monkeypox has spread rapidly in recent months. More than 21,000 people across 79 countries have caught it in an unusual outbreak that began in

Aloe Vera for Boils: Benefits, Usage, and More - Healthline

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Boils are pus-filled bumps that develop underneath the skin when bacteria clog hair follicles, causing an infection and inflammation. They can appear as a single bump or as a cluster of bumps. Boils can be painful and large, and they can sometimes rupture. If left untreated, the infection can spread to other parts of your body. Different therapies can treat a boil, including oral antibiotics and pain medication. In addition, natural therapies like aloe vera may improve this skin condition. Here's what you need to know about using aloe vera for the treatment of boils. Aloe vera is a cactus-like plant that grows in hot, dry climates. These plants are easy to care for and can be either indoor or outdoor plants. In addition to being a popular, low-maintenance houseplant, the aloe inside the plant is sometimes used for skin health. Aloe is an ingredient in many skin care products such as shaving creams, facial cleansers, and moisturizers. It contains humectants, a moisturizing agent tha

Blinding Eye Disease Is Strongly Associated With Heart Disease and Stroke - Mount Sinai

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New York, NY (July 12, 2022) Patients with a specific form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the United States, are at significant risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke, according to new research from New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai. This study, published in the July issue of Retina, is the first to demonstrate a link between the disorders. "For the last three decades researchers have suggested an association between AMD and cardiovascular disease, but there has been no conclusive data on this until now. Our retinal team answered this important question by focusing on two different varieties of AMD that can be seen with advanced retinal imaging. We discovered that only one form of AMD, that with subretinal drusenoid deposits, is tightly connected to high-risk vascular diseases, and the other form

How to spot signs of hearing and vision problems in babies and toddlers - WRAL News

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By UNC Health If your baby or toddler is having trouble hearing or seeing, early intervention is key to keeping their development on track. However, little ones can't express themselves as well as older children can, so how can you tell if their hearing or eyesight is off? The good news is that the pressure is not all on you. Routine screenings at the hospital and doctor's office are designed to ensure your child can see and hear as expected. At home, you can be aware of warning signs of potential vision or hearing problems. UNC Health pediatrician Edward Pickens, MD, shares how providers check for hearing and vision problems, as well as what indicators parents can watch for at home. How doctors monitor hearing in babies and toddlers Even if your baby seems to respond to sounds, it is still possible that they can have some degree of hearing loss. That's why doctors want to monitor your child's hearing from the start of life. Most states, includin